- Withdrawn

Lot 27 (Imperial War Museum Duxford, 14th October 2020)

Lot details

*WITHDRAWN*

egistration No: ENX733C
Chassis No: B9472451HR0FE
MOT: Exempt

  • Treated to an extensive restoration with considerable expenditure including £1,500 on re-chroming alone
  • Restoration completed two years ago and used sparingly since and still rated as 'excellent' throughout by the vendor
  • Original 260ci (4.2 litre) V8 engine and four-speed manual gearbox
  • Fitted with uprated brakes and shock absorbers as well as some new panels during the restoration
  • Resprayed in Jaguar Metallic Grey and retrimmed in Red Leather with Black hood

This matching numbers Tiger is a fine example of a relatively rare breed. It was the subject of a five-year restoration that was completed as recently as 2018. The considerable expenditure included in excess of £1,500 on re-chroming alone. Along the way, the brakes and dampers were uprated and a stainless steel exhaust system installed, while the numerous new items fitted included various body panels, Yokohama tyres and hood. The car is now resplendent in Jaguar Metallic Grey matched to a White-piped Red leather interior, and rides on Minilite wheels. The vendor unsurprisingly considers the Sunbeam to have ‘excellent’ bodywork, paintwork, interior trim, V8 engine and four-speed manual transmission, and is offering the car complete with woodrim steering wheel, V5C showing just three former keepers, a collection of past invoices, and numerous photos of the restoration. Tigers don’t come much smarter than this.

The Sunbeam Tiger was conceived on the West Coast of the USA and inspired by the success of the AC Cobra – the result of inserting a small-block American V8 engine into the nose of the British designed and built AC Ace. Rootes American Motors Inc. saw the potential for performing a similar operation on the Sunbeam Alpine, whose 1.5-litre, four-cylinder engine made it more of a loping GT car than an out-and-out sports machine. Preliminary research suggested that the engine used to produce the Cobra – Ford’s 4.2-litre (260ci) ‘Windsor’ unit - would be the appropriate powerplant, and a prototype was commissioned from Carroll Shelby, the man behind the Cobra project. The basic layout of the Alpine was retained and the 164bhp engine endowed the car with a top speed of around 120mph and 0-60mph acceleration time of under eight seconds, leading Tigers to enjoy success in both racing and rallying over the years. A total of some 7,085 examples were eventually produced.

Vendor Condition Ratings:

Bodywork: 'Excellent'
Engine: 'Excellent'
Electrical Equipment: 'Excellent'
Paintwork: 'Excellent'
Gearbox: 'Excellent'
Interior Trim: 'Excellent'

For more information, please contact:
Paul Cheetham
paul.cheetham@handh.co.uk
07538 667452