Thu, 16th Apr 2009 13:30

The Pavilion Gardens

 
  Lot 12
 

1937 Austin Seven Ruby

Sold for £2,138

(including buyers premium)


Lot details
Registration No: Un-Reg
Chassis No: T.B.A.
Mot Expiry: None

Brainchild of Herbert Austin and Stanley Edge, the Austin Seven looked almost impossibly small when launched in 1922. Occupying the same 'footprint' as a motorcycle and sidecar combination, it nevertheless boasted all the advantages of a 'full-size' motor car. Responsible for helping motorise Britain while simultaneously sounding the cyclecar industry's death knell, the baby Austin was brilliantly yet simply engineered. Based around an 'A-frame' chassis equipped with all-round leaf-sprung suspension, four-wheel drum brakes and a spiral bevel back axle, it was powered by a sewing machine-esque 747cc sidevalve four-cylinder engine allied to three-speed (later four-speed) manual transmission. Introduced in July 1934, the Ruby Saloon was one of a series of models designed to rejuvenate the Seven. Visually distinguished by its smooth radiator cowling, hinged bonnet vents and curved back (incorporating a spare wheel cover), the newcomer combined a la mode styling with circa 50mph performance and laudable fuel economy. A strong sales success, the Ruby remained a staple part of the Seven range until production ceased in 1939.

Finished in maroon over black with red upholstery, this particular example has been on static display as part of a private Lake District collection for many years. Although reported to have been driven into the collection building under its own power, the Austin is currently a non-runner and will require recommissioning and re-registration with the DVLA prior to road use. Sold strictly as viewed the Seven is accompanied by a buff logbook which shows that it was formerly road registered as `CLV 402'.
 

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